Monday, August 29, 2011

Another Pan Loaf



This pan loaf turned out very well. With a less than academic approach, I got a loaf that looks acceptable and tastes as good as my expectations demanded. I used more than required sourdough starter, by about 27 g, and AP flour so to my inexperience, it seemed like the pan was the only way to go. The dough was too slack for a free standing loaf with my less than perfect shaping skills. I'm still trying to empty out the odds and ends of the flours in the fridge so I can justify opening the Heartland Mills flour that's stashed in the freezer. Perhaps I need to be bold and take a chance on a "leftover" loaf of all the flours I want to use up. I wouldn't be the first or the last baker to do so.

For this loaf, I changed the soaker from a 70% hydration to a 75% level. There was no specific reason to do so, just a whim, and no extraordinary results.I used molasses thinking that I might get a darker crumb but that didn't change. On the other hand, the crumb isn't dense and relatively light, a definite positive outcome. The crust did turn out nicely so molasses stays in the formula.

Here are the ingredients that made up this loaf.

Starter

40 g seed of 80% starter
20 g rye flour
60 g AP
60 g water at room temperature

Soaker

133 g whole meal flour
100 g water


Main Dough

267 g AP flour
166 g water at 85F
8 g kosher salt
15 g molasses
15 g sunflower oil
all of starter
all of soaker

I followed my usual procedures in the mixing and baking of this pan loaf. Using bread flour in place of AP and lowering the hydration by a couple points might give me a dough that would shape up enough for a free form loaf. Raisins and walnuts sound like possible additions. This formula isn't that far removed from my psomi formula so it seems a reasonable assumption.

Here's a brief recognition of the individuality of cardinals. I see a lot of cardinals at the feeder just outside my window. I admit that I had never paid much attention to them before other than recognizing their red color. There is more variation in their appearance than I had thought possible, especially among the female cardinals. It's definitely a subject of curiosity that warrants investigation.
This has become evident after the new feeder with a small bowl or plate like addition on the bottom of the feeder was installed. All the birds spend more time perched, giving us better opportunities to observe. The woodpeckers haven't been around lately to feed at this new station but that may just be coincidence. They've been frequent but never daily guests at the feeder. Chipping sparrows and nuthatches are appearing more frequently so there is no need for us to be concerned that the feed will go stale.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

A Slightly Eccentric Loaf

One of the pleasures of being an amateur home baker is that I don't have to produce loaves in consistency and volume to keep the doors open. It also means that if I "brick" the loaf or otherwise bake a tasteless or "off" loaf, I probably won't have another until the next afternoon. Yes, I could always throw together a quick yeasted loaf in about six hours but it hasn't come to that yet.

That kind of attitude lead me to today's loaf in question. First, I wanted to try to bake a smaller loaf, not the usual 800g+ loaves of habit. Then I also decided to use a rye starter on a 33% WWW loaf. It sounded like fun to me. On TFL, someone who's just starting into sourdough will ask if a baker has to be strict in their type of starter used, such as a WW for whole wheat loaf or a rye starter for a rye loaf. This happens frequently because they're concerned that they might have to keep more than one starter. Purists will do so but once you get past that stage, you learn that you don't have to. I'm still maintaining one starter and I adapt it to each loaf. There are no sourdough police to enforce such a rule so try what you want, keep the good recipes, and toss the not so good recipes in a file titled "To Be Tweaked Later".



Here's the ingredients for the loaf under discussion.

Starter
20 g seed starter
40 g water, room temperature
50 g medium rye flour

Soaker
100 g Heartland Mills Golden Buffalo WWW, or other white whole wheat flour
70 g water at room temperature


Dough:
200 g bread flour
130 g water at 85F
10 g unsalted butter
15 g molasses
7 g kosher salt
all of starter
all of soaker




 I think the loaf turned out well. Maybe an extra 20-30 minutes proofing wouldn't have hurt but the dough felt ready to me. The "Magic Bowl" method was used for this loaf and it looks like I ought to revisit this recipe in a month or two. A matchup of this bread and some bratwurst or smoked kielbasa sounds appealing to me as a lunch before a football game. Horseradish would fit in the overall mix as well.

Outside the window, the yard is in need of serious work. There was some 6 inches of rainfall between late Thursday night and Monday at noon. That has resulted in a surge of the "bad" grasses in the lawn, crab grass, nutsedge, and red fescue. The lawn looks terrible so when I give it a buzz cut tomorrow, it will merely go to the other extreme.
The Missouri River is still above flood stage and flowing at a higher than average speed. It remains an impressive sight.
There are a pair of hummingbirds in the area now. They visit the Rose of Sharon bushes in our yard. With the nights getting cooler each week, the hummingbirds will soon resume their migration southward and I'll have to look for some new aerobatic daredevils for comic diversion from the autumnal obligations of getting the yard and garden ready for winter.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Friday, August 19, 2011

The Current Pan Loaf

This is what's on the cutting board for sandwiches and other duties today. It's a 33% whole wheat loaf made with some home milled flour, the bran being plainly visible. As per habit of late, I soaked the WW for about four hours while I watched the starter mature.

I'm still flirting with a variation of my starter. For the County Fair breads, I substituted Heartland Mills Golden Buffalo and found it to respond well in elaborating a starter, slightly better than using rye flour which is my go to addition to the KAF AP. There's a possibility that the rye isn't kicking it  like it once did due to age.
Even though KAF sources a great deal of its flour from Kansas mills and Heartland is in SW Kansas, there's nothing to say that the wheat for the flours came from the same areas and would have similar yeast spores. Sure, it might have happened like that but I'm not betting my retirement funds on that. I'm just happy that they play well together. I have some Heartland Mills rye flour in the freezer that I'll open up as soon as the current rye is finished and I'm very curious to see what that does.

I think I got a decent crumb on this pan loaf. the dough was somewhat sticky but manageable enough to shape. I used AP flour on this loaf and it wasn't hard to tell that a boule or batard would have flattened out as soon as it was ready to slash.
One of these days, I'll actually restrain myself and make a smaller loaf to see if I'm defeating myself with these 800 g+ loaves that I make as a rule. Perhaps a 600 or 650 g loaf would be easier to shape or more likely to maintain its shape before loading in the oven.
The bread tastes pretty good and is light or soft in texture, not chewy at all. I used dried malt extract, something home beer brewers use often, instead of other sweeteners such as honey or sugar. It's relatively tasteless in a WW loaf.
Here are the ingredients and quantities that made this loaf happen.

150 g active sourdough starter
Soaker:
133 g whole meal flour
89 g water

Main Dough
267 g AP flour
177 water at 85F
5 g light dried malt extract
8 g kosher salt
all of starter
all of soaker
15 g sunflower oil

I didn't use any exotic or arcane methods in making the loaf. It doesn't need them. With a bread like this, I find that attention to detail in ingredients and procedure will get me through to the end and pull out a loaf fit for the table.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

The Beingness of Light

I'm not baking today, just trying to revive some two year old dry starter that has been kept in the freezer. It came from the first month or so of my starter so I'm curious to see if it has any remaining vitality. After 12 hours, it's not looking very active at all. I thought that if it got rolling well that I would hand off a portion to the couple that organized and now run the local farmer's market. Their son wants to start baking bread. A sourdough might overwhelm a less than enthusiastic novice but only if someone tells them that it's hard to do, which of course, it isn't. Should the science experiment at resurrection fail, I have a plan B.

The quality of the sunlight here on the western bank of the Middle Coast- AKA Missouri River, is changing. The harsh glare of the summer sun is surreptitiously morphing into the golden tones of autumn. Midday sun remains as burdensome as July sun but in mid morning around 930AM CDT or late afternoon, 430PM CDT, it sits upon the eye much easier.
The plants haven't changed but the birds are changing their habits. They seem to be arriving and departing in flocks rather than as free agents. Their appetites have accelerated the replenishment schedule for our feeders. There are two varieties of finches that are year round residents but the chipping sparrows should be migrating at the end of summer.
A solitary male goldfinch has been around the yard lately. Goldfinches are known as year round inhabitants of this corner of Kansas but they have been notably absent over the past couple months. As their numbers increase and they become regulars outside the window, I'll refill their thistle seed feeder and hang it up once more. They'll have to establish their domination there because the juncos will take to that feeder and literally eat their lunch when they return sometime in November.

Monday, August 15, 2011

A Horiatiko Psomi Recipe

Horiatiko Psomi

I make absolutely no claim that my formula is an authentic Greek recipe, handed down by Ya-Ya, my immigrant grandmother from Thessaloniki, upon her deathbed. It's no such thing and my grandmothers came from New Brunswick, Canada and the old Austro-Hungarian Empire. If you do enough internet searches for bread recipes, you'll find that this one is similar to an Italian bread. Admit it, a good baker has to be a good businessperson and they'll bake what their customers want to buy.
I had made breads much like this recipe before I learned that it was very similar to a Greek recipe. That was not inspired creativity on my part, just basic enthusiasm for baking a reasonably simple loaf. Finding that the recipe had a Greek name was bonus because I wanted to enter a bread in the County Fair that I thought would win a category. I haven't spent enough time doing internet searches to find out whether or not there are actual Greek recipes that include whole wheat flour as this formula does. There very well could be such recipes. This formula won the “ethnic bread” category with my variation.
My little twist to individualize the basic formula is to use a soaker of white whole wheat flour. I'm a big fan of soakers because 1. they're easy and 2. they add flavor that is elusive to identify but so very good! Truly, they are a no lose proposition to the home baker, an actual win-win device.
Much of the credit for the recipe goes to Maggie Glezer who included it in her book, “A Blessing of Bread”. I learned about that recipe on The Fresh Loaf website where it was identified and advocated by Dmsnyder, a most excellent home baking enthusiast. While my version is a batard, Ms Glezer used an 8” cake pan and Mr Snyder used a 9” pie pan to bake their loaves. I've used an 8” cake pan and it's the more dramatic looking loaf.
I hope to include instructions for both so bear with me and by the end, you'll either enjoy my efforts or despise me for leading you on and wasting your time. This particular formula or recipe will be in a different, more chatty format so beware of the extended explanations and other literary minefields. My blog is also an opportunity for me to regain some writing muscles that haven't had enough exercise for many years. Time to start the flour flying.



Starter
I used a sourdough starter but the possibility of using a yeast preferment is there as well. Simply use the same hydration level to adjust the weight up by 30 g and use a pinch of instant dry yeast or active dry yeast.
30 g seed starter
56 g water at 85F
20 g white whole wheat flour
60 g all purpose flour
In a medium bowl, dissolve or mix the seed starter with the water. Add flour and mix well. Cover and keep at room temperature until starter peaks (6-12 hours dependent on temperature). Save the extra starter to build a new starter for acquaintances, for pate fermentee, or to dry and save as a backup should your seed source fail.
Soaker
100 g white whole wheat flour
70 g water
In a small bowl, mix flour and water thoroughly, leaving no dry flour in bowl. WWW can be more thirsty than AP so a small amount of extra water may be required. Cover and leave at room temperature for no more than 8 hours. If the starter is slow, simply put the soaker in your refrigerator for a while. Alternatively, you can add a small pinch of salt,< 1 g, at the time of mixing if you want to start your soaker at the same time as your starter. Having used this salt addition suggestion previously, I can say that I noted a little bit extra salt flavor in the crust of the finished loaves. The soaker should be at room temperature when mixing your dough.



Dough
150 g starter
all of soaker
300 g bread flour
196 g water at 85F
8 g kosher salt
15 g honey or brown sugar
15 g olive oil, about 1 Tbs
olive oil to coat the pan, optional
  1. Add the water to your mixer bowl. Stir in the starter and mix well. Cut the soaker into small chunks and add to the bowl. Using the paddle blade or dough hook, stir the contents briefly. Add the flour and using the dough hook, mix at first speed to a shaggy mass, about 1 minute. Cover the bowl and autolyse for 20-30 minutes.
  2. Sprinkle the salt over the top of the dough and fold in quickly with a spatula. Add honey to the bowl and fold in quickly with a spatula. Add olive oil to the bowl and mix at first speed for three minutes to incorporate all the ingredients. Mix at second speed for 3-4 minutes. The dough should clear the sides but may still be attached to the bottom.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for about 30 seconds. Shape into a ball and place into a large, oiled bowl for bulk fermentation. Turn the dough ball to coat with oil and then cover the bowl.
  4. In rooms where the temperature is around 70F, stretch and fold at 50 and 100 minutes. At 150 minutes, turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, knead for 30 seconds, and pre-shape into a boule. Cover with your large bowl and let the dough relax for 15-20 minutes while you prepare your 8” pie pan, banneton, or couche. When room temperatures are around 80F, stretch and fold at 45and 90 minutes then preshape at 135 minutes.
  5. Prepare your 8” cake pan by using olive oil to coat the bottom and walls of the pan. Shape your dough into a tight boule and center it in the pan for proofing. Cover the boule with a flour dusted towel and place the pan in a plastic bag for an overnight retarded fermentation in a refrigerator.
  6. About 1 hour before the planned beginning of the bake, do a finger poke test for proofing and leave the pan in the bag on the counter top. Approximately 30 minutes before the start of the bake, preheat the oven to 450F.
  7. Using a centered rack, load your pan without slashing the dough. Lower the oven temperature to 400F and bake for 30 minutes. At 30 minutes, turn the pan 180 degrees and continue to bake for another 25-30 minutes or until the internal temperatue reaches 205-207F.
  8. Cool on a wire rack for 4 hours before serving. 



        As an alternative, you can choose to shape the dough into a batard. If you use a banneton, place a lightly oiled sheet of plastic wrap over the banneton, place in a plastic bag, and place in a refrigerator for an overnight retarded proofing. If using a couche, follow procedures to prevent your dough from drying out. The overnight proofing is preferred but proofing at a moderate room temperature should take about 2-2.5 hours. Preheat your oven with a baking stone in the center at 475F for 1/2 hour. Sesame seeds are an attractive addition to a batard and may be placed by spraying the top of the loaf with water then scattering seeds across the top. Slash the loaf with at least two or three cuts at an angle to the loaf. Load your loaf onto the stone using a peel or parchment paper and lower the temperature of the closed oven to 450F for 10 minutes. Lower the temperature to 425F and bake for 5 more minutes. Remove the parchment paper, turn the loaf around, and continue baking at 425F for 5 minutes more. Lower the temperature to 400F for the last 18-20 minutes. When the internal temperature is 205-207F, the loaf will be done. Cool on a wire rack for 3-4 hours before serving.


This is what worked for me. I accept that the instructions aren't what could be called professional or at a textbook level. I have fun baking and putting my formulae on the internet for others to read and hopefully, enjoy baking. I hope you have as much fun as I do when baking.

Your comments, editing suggestions, humor, and questions are welcome.

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Sourdough Anadama Bread Recipe

It must be the weather. Things cooled down out here in my little patch of Kansas, enough to warrant turning off the AC and opening the windows to let the fresh air in. That doesn't do much for the state of greenery since most of it is pale to brown in color. Giant cracks have appeared in the lawn. Some of my peonies have lost much of their green and without copious amounts of rain in the immediate future, I may be better off to trim them back to the ground, weed thoroughly in the area, and hope for better conditions next year. There's nothing new to report on in the bird population except that we must be having more guests or heavier feeding guests at the feeders because I'm refilling more often.

I put my literary and baking shoulder to the wheel, gathering discipline enough to forgo a pleasant nap, and finished my formula for the Sourdough Anadama Bread. As I continue to research more recipes on the internet, there still seem to be none alike. Maybe that means mine could be as authentic as any I've seen so far.
The formula for my Horiatiko Psomi is next and I'll be pounding that out over the next week. For anyone not interested in an Anadama recipe, now is a good time to bid adieu and remember that comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

For the curious, the persistent, or gluttons for the punishment of wading through another of my formulae, here's the recipe. There may be some slight deviation in weights from an earlier post but don't worry, be intrepid, and adjust your water and flour as needed to get a workable dough. I'd appreciate any feedback from those willing to take a chance on replicating this formula, stating whether you think it good or bad.

Anadama Bread

Starter:
30 g seed starter
20 g rye flour
60 g AP flour
56 g water at 85F
Mix seed starter with water. Add flours and stir well to a thick batter, leaving no dry flour. Leave on counter to develop to peak for 8-14 hours depending on room temperature.



Soaker #1
90 g whole wheat flour
60 g water at room temperature



Soaker #2
70 g corn meal ( yellow is stated in most traditional recipes)
46 g water at room temperature.



After starter has been fermenting for 4 hours, mix soakers in bowls, leaving no dry flour or meal, and cover. Leave at room temperature.



Dough:
All of starter
Both soakers
230 g bread flour
150 g water at 85F
9 g kosher salt
30 g melted butter
30 g unsulphured molasses
  1. In a medium sized bowl, add the molasses to the water and mix well to disperse the molasses through the water. If the molasses doesn't mix well with the water, warm briefly in a microwave and stir again. The temperature of the mixture should cool to less than 95F before being in contact with the starter. Add the mixture to the bowl. Add starter to the bowl. Add soakers in small pieces to the bowl. Mix briefly with a spatula or the dough hook then add the bread flour. Mix at first speed until you achieve a shaggy mass, usually less than 1 minute. Cover and autolyse, or rest, for 20-30 minutes.
  2. Add the melted butter to the bowl. Sprinkle the salt over the top of the dough. Mix at first speed for three minutes to blend all the ingredients. Adjust flour or water as needed, 1 Tbs at a time. Mix at second speed for 3-4 minutes. Dough should clear the sides of the mixer bowl but not necessarily the bottom of the bowl.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and gently knead for about 1 minute. The dough will probably be a little bit sticky when handling. Shape into a ball and place into an oiled bowl, turning the dough to coat the surface. Cover the bowl.
  4. Bulk fermentation is 2.5 hours. Stretch and fold dough at 50 and 100 minutes. At 150 minutes, turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and pre-shape in a ball. Cover with your bowl or a damp cloth and rest for 10 minutes.
  5. Shape as desired, into a batard, boule, or a pan loaf. Pan loafs are traditional. The loaf can be proofed for about 2-2.5 hours at room temperature but an overnight retarded fermentation is preferable for best and most complex flavor. Remove loaf from the refrigerator at least one hour before planned baking time and use a poke test to check progress of the loaf.
  6. Preheat the oven at 475F for at least 30 minutes with the stone, if using, on the middle rack slot.
  7. Batards and boules should be loaded onto a peel or parchment paper on a sheet pan and slashed. Load into oven and immediately turn down the oven to 450F. Bake for 10 minutes and turn the oven down to 425F for 5 minutes. Pull the parchment paper and turn the loaf around. Continue at 425F for 5 more minutes then turn the oven down to 400F for the final 18-20 minutes. If using a pan, check brownness of the top at midpoint and lightly cover the top with aluminum foil if browning too quickly.
  8. Bread is done when the internal temperature is 202-206F. Cool on a footed wire rack for at least 4 hours before cutting and serving.



Leavenworth County Fair Results and some gratuitous goat pictures.



Tuesday morning, I rolled out of town to enter my loaves at the Tonganoxie, KS County Fair grounds. Detracting from my usual oblivious confidence was the fact that I had baked with my newly rebuilt starter, one that had been percolating away on the counter rather than being kept in the fridge. The flavor is acceptable, even better than it's foundation but it wasn't as predictable in behavior. Even so, I was going with the flow of it because I wasn't baking for the paltry prize money, just the fun of posting brag shots for my fellow bread bakers and the diminutive ribbons. It wasn't work at all.

This is my Horiatiko Psomi, a Greek "Rustic Bread". While researching Greek breads, I found a recipe that used dry yeast and figured that I could do a sourdough version. In fact, I already had done so a few times without knowing that it was a Greek recipe. My particular tweak on the recipe was to use some white whole wheat flour to add the color and character to the appearance of the crumb. There's an Italian version of this bread whose name translates to "olive oil bread". This particular loaf was a 25% WWW version. I've gone up to 33% WWW and used an oiled 8" pie pan to bake a boule that is very cool looking. It's a very good bread, fit for family and friends. I'll have the recipe posted sometime before the end of the month so stay tuned for further advancements.

This second loaf is a sourdough. This had a 90% bread flour/5% rye/5% WWW makeup for flour. I was told by a junior judge that it had been up for consideration for bread division grand prize. Points were deducted for the holes in the crumb. WTF? Anyways, it lost to a most excellent cinnamon roll that could add weight on your waistline by just looking at it. It's hard to feel slighted when the competition is that tough. I think that next year I'll enter my Sourdough Kansas Pioneer Bread as way to overcome the master judge's preference for a tighter crumb. It's also an uncommon style which may be an advantage. I have the next twelve months to work that one out.

So what's with the goats you may ask. I like goats as a subject. I'm not interested in owning a goat but they do appeal to my amateur photographic sense of humor.

I'm still working on finishing the Anadama Bread formula but it's close. The Psomi formula will be posted after that. As for the sourdough, I don't think there's anything too special in it but if requested, I'll post a thumbnail sketch of it for folks that know how to flesh it out. It's basically a pain au levain with 20 g of Heartland Mills Golden Buffalo WWW in the flour.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Friday, August 05, 2011

Poor Old Anna

After researching Anadama Bread recipes, the only constants through them are 1. the name of the alleged mistreating wife 2. the use of molasses instead of sugar or honey and 3. a portion of corn meal. We can't be sure whether the aggrieved husband was a farmer, sailor, or woodsman. I did find the flavor of molasses in bread to be an intriguing note that easily slips in under whole wheat or rye. Indeed, molasses is often used in rye breads to lend color to the loaf.


My bench work at developing a reliable formula for a Pioneer Bread or Sourdough Pioneer Bread made me ponder if the Pioneer Bread was just a baker using ingredients at hand, substituting vegetable oil for butter and sugar for molasses. It doesn't matter too much because both are hearty breads. Both stand up well in sandwiches with some kind of pork or beef.


This particular loaf was done with a sourdough starter. It can just as as easily be done with IDY or ADY. Whatever the choice of leaven, I found that an overnight proofing contributed to a more complex flavor. Here's the brief rundown on what happened to make this loaf.


Starter
20 g rye flour
60 g AP flour
56 g water at 85F
30 g seed starter of 80% hydration.


Soaker # 1
90 g whole wheat
60 g water at room temp


Soaker # 2
70 g corn meal (yellow corn meal is suggested)
46 g water at room temp


Dough
All of starter
Both soakers
240 g bread flour
160 g water at 85F
9 g kosher salt
30 g unsulphured molasses
30 g melted butter


Presently, I don't have this all knocked out into an ODF or .pdf file but the procedures weren't anything out of the ordinary for a loaf I made using a mixer. I will have the file ready for emailing or attaching sometime after 9 August. My bread baking brain is presently engaged with thoughts of getting my entries into the County Fair on Tuesday morning.
This bread is a good bread. The dough turned out to be relatively easy to shape, slash, and transfer to the baking stone without trauma. The crumb isn't particularly open but still is tender and has the molasses under note in the flavor. I think it would work well in something like a pulled pork sandwich with some Gates BBQ sauce. KC Masterpiece BBQ sauce uses a molasses base so that's another choice. Ham and Swiss cheese with a Dijon mustard is another sandwich to try. It's not bad with a little bit of butter and a cup of coffee in the morning. 


In order to get psyched up for the bread competition at the County Fair, I'm building my starter up fresh and not refrigerating it. I'm hoping that keeping it on the counter will help build up the beneficial bacteria counts that will give my breads a more memorable flavor. Instead of discarding tomorrow, I plan on baking a loaf for an elderly couple that know how to please my ego by describing my bread as old fashioned in style. I don't have a clue as to what kind of bread they really ate in the 1920s and 1930s but it does get them a couple of free loaves a year just for the compliment. By Sunday, I'll have enough fresh starter for two loaves and the leftovers can be dried to give away and use as a back up.


Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

Random Babble

Maybe this is something that has happened to you. I was standing outside, next to the grill, and saw a hummingbird nearby. It was an emerald throated hummingbird to be exact and only about 8 feet away. The object of its attention was a large flower on a vine that Mrs PG has placed in a planter. Hummingbirds are different in person as related to what they look like in film or on TV. They're tiny, delicate, and their wings are a perpetual motion machine. I was in a child like state of awe. Then it was gone for the evening. Hummingbirds will be around here for a couple of weeks.

If I'm lucky, the monarch butterflies will take their place. There is some milkweed growing around the yard so there is a good chance they will find their way here. Monarchs really love and devour fennel plants, stripping the leaves down to nubs, the multicolored off spring searching for whatever may be left over before they too disappear.

Right now I'm waiting for my preshaped dough to relax enough for me to shape a batard. It's another attempt at an Anadama loaf. The dough is just a little sticky but feels like it will shape without trauma. The loaf will get an overnight proof in the refrigerator. I may not have time to bake tomorrow morning due to schedule conflicts but that's OK. I want a fully proofed loaf for the oven. Pictures will be added after the bake.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.