Monday, September 15, 2014

Two City Limits Soaker Sourdough Variations

Just as another SWAG experiment to resolve my problems with shaping my dough, I decided to change my procedures a little bit, tweak the hydration lower, and see if I could still get a decent crumb. These are the first experiments and they didn't turn out bad at all. I think a long retarded fermentation wouldn't hurt, but so far, so good.

I lowered the hydration in simple ways, less water, less starter, and a lower hydration starter. That wasn't rocket science. Using my large wooden bread bowl for the first loaf, I soaked the white whole wheat flour in the main dough water before adding the starter, and aerated the ingredients into a slurry with a hand whisk.

I knew that doing that would slow down the yeast action because the dough temperature at the end of mixing wouldn't be optimal but it was my experiment and I wasn't in a hurry for another loaf.

After the slurry was ready, I added the flour and mixed until I had the desired shaggy mass, covered the bowl, and let it rest for about twenty minutes.Then I lightly misted the dough and spread the salt over the dough. With my left hand turning the bowl, I used a curved dough tool turn the dough with about thirty strokes. After two more turns at twenty minute intervals, I let the dough rest for another twenty minutes and then turned it out on to my floured work surface. Then I did a quick stretch and fold before placing the dough in an oiled container to finish the bulk fermentation.
When the dough was ready for shaping, it had plenty of strength to resist me. This particular loaf had a seven hour rest in the refrigerator and was slow to finish proofing. That's fine, it turned out well and I have another trial loaf almost ready to slice as I type.

The procedure isn't quite refined enough as of yet. I still have a few wrinkles to iron out. I don't claim to have reinvented the wheel here. The method does seem to lessen some of the problems that come from using  fresh ground or stone ground whole wheat flours. Soaking allows for easier judgement in whether or not the dough is wet enough and could also diminish the cutting effect of the bran in the WW flour. The second loaf used hard red WW yet it had little of the bitterness that is accepted as part of whole wheat flour use.

Starter
110 g at 100% hydration, 75% AP/25% WWW
Soaker
230 g water
90 fresh milled WWW
Main Dough
270 g KAF bread flour
9 g kosher salt

The second loaf was done in my mixer. I used the whisk attachment to aerate the soaker/starter slurry.

Starter
150 g at 80% hydration
Soaker
90 g fresh milled hard red whole wheat
225 g water at 85F
Main dough
270 h KAF bread flour
9 g kosher salt
This dough was relatively firm despite the fact that the mix was only three minutes at first speed, then three more minutes at second speed. Still, it's not a bad looking crumb for a 25% WW loaf.

The plants in the yard and garden are starting to show the signs of shutting down. The shorter daylight and below average temperatures do make the marigolds that much brighter but it's going to be tough to give up having more fresh, ripe tomatoes than we could eat. The sage and rosemary should last another month at least before its time to pack them in straw to winter over. That will give me time enough for a loaf or two of Panmarino and some focaccia with sage.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.


Monday, September 01, 2014

City Limits Sourdough with Wheat Germ

The introductory picture is a selection of chiles and a couple of tomatoes for some quick and dirty pico de gallo. If i don't talk to myself and say that I was fool, then I obviously didn't add enough chiles. The two big peppers are of the Giant Marconi variety. They're not a true corno de toro  but they'll do. The larger sample was about ten inches long. I complained about little production earlier but the plant seems to be just starting to hit
its stride now.

This particular loaf seems to be disappearing a bit faster than I expected. Just another "freestyle" loaf that happened to work out with a flavorful crust and a bit of a bite in the crumb from the wheat germ. We've enjoyed this particular formula.

Starter
130 g at 100% hydration,
75% organic AP/ 25% white whole wheat

Soaker
30 g Bob's Red Mill wheat germ
30 g water

Main Dough
288 g bread flour
72 g WM Prairie Gold WWW
All of starter
All of soaker
9 g kosher salt

There's a smaller variety of birds at the feeders right now. Since the usual suspects aren't migratory, it's probably just a case of the MIA sorts are feasting elsewhere. Of course, part of the problem could be that the large number of finches are fighting it out for perch space. They've managed to bully the sparrows. We occasionally see a green throat hummingbird in the yard, usually around a Rose of Sharon bush.


Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Shiao Ping's House Bread


I haven't been satisfied with my progress on baking as of late. The dough just doesn't seem to feel right so I've tried changing the ingredient ratios, particularly the hydration and the flours, but the dough remains slack and tacky. I talked to the vendor at the City Market who provides me with home milled flours at a very reasonable cost and Jenni is having similar problems. The weather is our best guess and an easy target since it won't talk back.

My next variable to change is the flour ratios for feeding the starter. I've been using Central Milling AP almost exclusively so it may be time to concoct a batch of 70% AP, 20% white whole wheat, and 10% whole rye to use over the next month or so. I've long favored the use of a bit of rye to enliven my starter and it looks like now is a good time.

This first loaf is a sourdough with a Tbs of raw honey from Thad and Tama's hives. There was also 5% spelt added for the special aroma that comes out of the oven as the loaf bakes.

The second loaf got its start from a recipe in "Baking by Hand'. The recipe appears to be their derivation of J Hamelman's Vermont Sourdough. I dug out my big wooden bread mixing bowl for this one. With 20% white whole wheat, this tasted pretty good but I had done something like this before so it didn't give me that feeling of accomplishment.

This last loaf did get me going a bit and despite its ugly looks due to my shortcoming in shaping, I felt pretty good about it. If you've hung out at the Fresh Loaf or Sourdough Companion for a while, you've probably run across some posts by Shiao Ping, a very accomplished home baker. I scaled down her recipe for her house miche using Baker's Math to adapt her work to a loaf size better suited for Mrs PG and I. This was another loaf that I mixed by hand to relearn that technique. It's going to take a while.

On the other hand, this one came out with a great tasting crust that had the tang that lingers in your mouth after the bread has been eaten. It had a nice crumb and the walls of the alveoli were gelatinized.I have a feeling this is going to be one those loaves that I keep going back to until I feel I've mastered the technique.

Starter
166 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
288 g bread flour
72 g white whole wheat
236 g water at 80F
9 g kosher salt

Even though we are now into the late summer season and the color of daylight is changing, my tomato plants are showing very little signs of early blight and the other afflictions that are common in my back yard. Good tomatoes are so common in the area this year that I'm having trouble giving them away. Joe F told me that he too hasn't had great luck with his cucumber and pepper production despite the better and timely rainfall of this year. The weather has brought us some very seasonal temperatures lately so lawns are turning brown, some trees are losing leafs, and the weeds are more easily overlooked.

The monarch butterfly migration has barely started so I'm reluctant to dig up some of the more raggedy looking flowers or to kill the milkweed. If I had planted some fennel in the garden, I'd know for sure they were in the area because their larvae(?) not only are attracted to the plants, they seem to strip everything off the stems.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.





Monday, August 11, 2014

A KAF Bread Flour Experiment Begins

Normally, I use Dakota Maid Bread Flour but for some reason, I went ahead and bought 5# of KAF BF to play with. So far, it seems like a nice bread flour but don't base your decision whether or or not to buy some on my say so. I bought the bag despite it costing over $5 at the local Kroger affiliate store.

My first loaf  was a sourdough with 25% white whole wheat and multi grain cereal soaker. I expected to see more of the soaked grains in the crumb but perhaps I should be doing that with a white bread formula.

Starter
130 g at 85% hydration,
fed with 75% organic AP/ 25% white whole wheat

Soaker
62 g 9 grain cereal mix
60 g water at room temperature

Main Dough
270 g KAF Bread Flour
90 g home milled white whole wheat
230 g water at 85F
All of starter
All of soaker
9 g kosher salt



It turned out to be nice loaf, with good flavor and crumb.








I had the opportunity to a class on bread baking for the Kansas Extension Service at our local library. While you might think you can cover a lot of material in an hour, I taught the class with no power point program or even using the video projector so I ended up clarifying a lot of times. One of the things I did do right was to bring in two loaves of basic white bread, both of which I had baked that morning. One was a straight dough and the other one was made with a poolish and an overnight proofing in the fridge. Fortunately for me, both loaves were good. The loaf made with the poolish really got a few of the basic points I had been teaching across to the class and the extension agent. It turned out to be such a good time, especially since I really hadn't taught a class in almost forty years, that I plan to work out a class in whole wheat breads to present as an idea at the next meeting of the Master Food Volunteers at the Extension Service office..

Basic White Bread
360 g bread flour
240 g water at 85F
7 g kosher salt
3 g active dry yeast

Modified White Bread Formula
Poolish
120 g bread flour
120 g water at 85F
1/8 tsp active dry yeast

Main Dough
240 g bread flour
120 g water at 85F
7 g kosher salt
1/4 tsp active dry yeast

Lots of visits to my obscure corner of the internet from the People's Republic of China and from Turkey. If someone from Turkey reads this and wants to share a few recipes or formulas for Turkish breads, please get in touch.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Two for Two Blues Loaves, lots of pix too!


 I must have had a yeast friendly atmosphere in my kitchen over the past few days when prepping my entries for this year's bread competition at the Leavenworth County Fair. I also baked a third loaf for the house which I really couldn't justify entering even though it still looks good to me. This year's grand prize went to a young woman who entered a braided egg loaf that, as soon as I checked out the competition,  recognized as having the look of the winner. As in baseball, there's always next year.

This first loaf, whose formula originated in a post by Floyd M. over at TFL, looked like a baurnbrot to me so I decided it could be an Austrian baurnbrot and that was how I entered it. I tweaked the recipe down in size and can't remember what else I might have changed over the past couple of years but it's still a good loaf It uses a huge pate fermentee, 50% of the flour, and only 3/8 tsp of ADY in all.

Preferment
220 g bread flour
118 g water at 85F
4 g kosher salt
1/8 tsp active dry yeast

Dough
126 g bread flour
32 g rye flour
43 g whole wheat flour
All of preferment
156 g water at 85F
4 g kosher salt
1/4 tsp ADY

This was loaf that I expected to take the big prize. It's a 90% bread flour/ 10% whole rye flour sourdough. Besides the ribbon, it was bought by one of the judges to take home. Entrants can chose to donate the unsampled portions of their loaves for  sale to support the Fair or take the loaves home.

Starter
120 g at 82% hydration,

75% AP/25% whole rye flour

Main Dough
324 g bread flour
36 g whole rye flour
235 g water at 85F
All of starter
8 g kosher salt





This third loaf is the one I chose to stay home. It's close to a French Country loaf in design, using fresh milled white whole wheat in the recipe. The chevron slashing shows that I'm adapting to the use of a small boning knife I found after cleaning out the old cabinets to get ready for the remodel project. I had to do something, the grapefruit knife with a curved blade tip is missing in action due to the same project. This is a successful bake with good oven spring and a moist, sweet tasting, open crumb.

Starter
120 g at 82% hydration
75% AP/25% whole rye flour

Main Dough
270 g bread flour
72 g white whole wheat flour
18 g whole rye flour
240 g water at 85F
All of starter
8 g kosher salt

It appears that the area is destined for another period of drought. The Midwest rainfall passes to the North, around Omaha and Des Moines, or to the South towards Wichita, Springfield, MO and Tulsa. While we have experienced some stifling heat, we've also had some very pleasant, no A/C required days. None of my acquaintances who garden have had better results than I have with their gardens. The insects are thriving as usual but vegetable production remains spotty. My experiment with letting some loose leaf lettuce go to seed hasn't brought in more birds but has resulted in some awkward and surreal looking plants. They're on their way out to make room for me to access some basil plants. Basil pesto pizza will soon be on the menu.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

A Couple of 3-2-1 Sourdoughs and a Rosemary Flat Bread

A 3-2-1 Sourdough is usually one of the easiest paths to a good, usually show off quality loaf. It can't get much easier than one part 100% hydration starter, 2 parts waters, and three parts flour, all by weight. There are some wrinkles that happen time to time and both of these seemed to be sticky when placed in the brotform. It might have been the weather and it might have been that the starter was only a single stage build rather than a two stage. As I've blathered before, if it tastes good, it is still good bread.

The difference between the two loaves is that the first used 20% hard red whole wheat and the second  used 20% white whole wheat flour


Far be it from me to mislead you today by calling the flat bread a true focaccia. I didn't use a biga in the build, I used a sponge of sorts.It does look like a focaccia so I'll give a rambling explanation of what happened and if you decide to follow along, you can name your flat bread a focaccia and I won't call the bread police.

Sponge
190 g water at 85F
90 g Central Milling AP flour
1/2 tsp active dry yeast
Mix the sponge, cover with plastic wrap, and leave at a warm room temperature for about three or four hours. The surface should have lots of active bubbles.

Main Dough
All of sponge
210 g CM AP flour
Tbs olive oil
6 g kosher salt
2-2.5 g finely chopped rosemary
Topping
1-2 tsp coarse sea salt
grated parmesan cheese (optional)
Italian or pizza seasonings

In a small bowl, mix salt into the flour. Whisk olive oil into the sponge, add some flour into the sponge, mix, and add remaining flour. Add the chopped rosemary leaves. Mix with a dough whisk or wooden spoon to a shaggy mass. Cover and rest the dough for about twenty minutes and then turn the dough with a bowl tool for about thirty strokes. Cover and rest for another twenty minutes then turn again. Cover and rest for twenty minutes then turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Quickly wash and dry the bowl then oil it with a little olive oil. Knead the dough for about a minute and place back into the bowl and cover. If the dough is still slack a stretch and fold or two should bring it to reasonable strength, for a flat bread, and then rest, covered, until it doubles in size.

Oil a jelly roll pan and place the dough into the center of the pan. Slowly stretch the dough, striving for a rough evenness, out to the corners of the pan. If the dough resists, cover it with a towel, wait ten minutes, and stretch again. Cover and let the dough rest at room temperature until it gains some height, 45-90 minutes depending on temperature.

Preheat the oven to 450F. A baking stone can be used when baking with the pan. I've done with and without, its the baker's choice. When the dough has risen and the oven warmed up, dimple the dough with your fingertips. Drizzle some olive oil on the dough and make sure that all the dimples have some oil in them, Sprinkle with the cheese if your so inclined and then the sea salt.

Load the pan into the oven on a middle rack. Turn the pan after ten minutes. Check the pan for color at the twenty minute mark. If its nice and golden, you're good, take the pan out. If not, your flat bread should be done at the twenty five minute mark. Remove the flat bread and cool on a wire rack. Serve as soon as possible after baking. Freeze leftovers, if there are any.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Friday, July 11, 2014

Cracked Wheat Pan Loaf

 Even though I was in need of a loaf for use around the house, I indulged my sense of whimsy to a minuscule degree with this loaf.I did a little bit of playing around with the ingredients and the oven temperature but still lived to bake another loaf.

As with my previous yeast loaves, I started out with RLB's blanket sponge and then added a cracked wheat (bulgur) soaker because I could. There was some Central Milling AP  mixed in with Graham flour in the sponge portion and the blanket. The dough really proofed out high above the lip of the pan and held its ground during the bake.



While the crumb isn't a magnificent example of being open, it was soft, sweet, and moist.

Soaker
65 g cracked wheat
42 g water
A few grains of kosher salt.
Mixed and covered at the same time as the sponge. It was added in two portions to the dough after the initial mix at first speed.

The blanket sponge was set up as follows:

72 g hard red whole wheat
28 g AP
                                                                    240 g water at 85F
                                                                    1/8 tsp ADY
The ADY was hydrated for 10 minutes in the mixer bowl and then stirred to disperse the ADY. The flour was added and mixed in, making a thin slurry.

                                                                     188 g bread flour
                                                                      72 g AP flour
                                                                      1/2 tsp ADY

The remaining flour and ADY was mixed in another bowl before being spooned on top of the slurry. The bowl was covered and left at room temperature for about six hours before mixing began. The initial mix was three minutes at first speed, after which I determined the dough needed another Tbs of water.
                                                                        8 g kosher salt
 The salt was added and the mixer went to second speed for two minutes. At this time, I added half the soaker, resumed second speed for a minute, added the rest of the soaker, and resumed mixing at second speed for one more minute.

Bulk fermentation required only three stretch and folds at twenty minute intervals and then an hour rest covered. After shaping, the dough was proofed in the pan for about 75 minutes. The loaf was baked in an oven preheated to 425F for 15 minutes, turned around, and then baked at 400 for twenty two minutes.



While my garden is growing vigorously, the only plant in full production is the chile de arbol plant which appears to be unable to control itself. It's large and prolific. The tomato plants are also huge, at least 6 1/2 ft-2 meters tall with lots of green fruit. Those are signs of an impending tomato bonanza for my neighbor and the volunteers at Cushing Hospital. The volunteers will have to make tough choices between tomatoes and cucumbers in about ten days or so. All that garlic that I harvested last week is still drying. Since there are 45 heads of hard neck garlic of very good size from this year's harvest, I should be in good shape garlic wise for quite a while. I found the rogue garlic underneath the spreading day lily leaves in one of my flowerbeds. Two were miserable examples but two were worth setting aside for replanting in the Autumn. The tunnels indicative of moles burrowing through the yard have reappeared. They obviously have nothing but contempt for my efforts to discourage them.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Sunday, June 29, 2014

16% and 25% WWW Sourdough Loaves


 Thanks to Mrs PG, the Dakota Maid Bread Flour is back in stock. So on Thursday night, I began to build up a starter for some weekend baking. The first loaf went to Mr Barney for helping me out with a part of our kitchen remodeling project. I don't have the required tools but Mr Barney does so I baked a loaf that I knew his family would enjoy.

It was a 16% WWW sourdough at about 72% hydration. The DM flour made it a lot easier to do this time. The dough was a little bit sticky during shaping but an overnight retarded proofing in the fridge helped out quite a bit. The loaf didn't have an outflow in the oven after loading so I got to breath a sigh of relief and continue work on the next loaf for Mrs PG and I.

16% WWW Sourdough
Starter
150 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
300 g Dakota Maid Bread Flour
60 g Wheat Montana Prairie Gold flour
240 g water at 85 F
All of starter
9 g kosher salt

25% WWW Sourdough
Starter
150 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
270 g Dakota Maid Bread Flour
90 g stone ground Wheat Montana Prairie Gold flour
230 g water at 85 F
All of starter
9 g kosher salt

This second loaf differed from my usual routine in that I used the refrigerator during the bulk fermentation of the dough. I shaped the dough for my brotform as soon as it had dried out from the first loaf. It sat downstairs in the somewhat cooler basement while we applied a circular saws, sabre saw, hammer, and other implements of discipline on some manufactured wood products. By the time I was ready to sweep up the sawdust and wood scraps, the second loaf had proofed very well without any oversight. It turned out well though this time around I didn't follow the bake with a five minute cool down with the oven door cracked open. Its A/C weather in Kansas these days and cracking open an oven cooling down from 425 F just didn't seem very prudent. There is a difference in the flavor of the two different forms of the WM Prairie Gold in loaves like this that goes beyond the percentage. The stone ground flour has a bit of the tannin flavors that are in hard red whole wheat flour whereas the store bought Prairie Gold is smoother. To put the difference in perspective, a beer drinking baker will recognize the signature of the Cascade hops used in Sierra Nevada  Pale Ale. When drinking a similar ale, he or she will notice the difference if Chinook or Centennial hops are used. In the end, its all good, just different enough to notice.



The passing of the Summer solstice seems to be making a difference in my garden. The garlic crop is almost ready, I dug up a few, and should be ready to start the digging  by Thursday. I still don't have any ripe tomatoes which isn't good at all. July 4th is my usual latest day for the first red, ripe tomato and this year could be different. I suppose that as long as the local deer or squirrels ruin my expectations, I should get over it. A few of the wheat berries left in the straw I use for mulch actually grew up enough for me to actually recognize it before it got knocked over. Not many birds are at my feeder these days since there is so much other food available at this time of year.

Just twelve or so miles north of here in Atchison, KS, a tornado and torrential rains passed through tonight. We saw a very brief shower and heard some thunder but missed the excitement. I've lived here in the middle of tornado country for forty years and have yet to see a tornado. Maybe I will and maybe I won't before I die. As long as I have good shelter to run to when it starts to drop down, I'd still like to see one from a distance.

My obscure corner of the internet had a few unexpected views from Brazil this past week. With all the excitement of the World Cup going on down there, I was surprised to see that happen.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.


Monday, June 23, 2014

A Nice Pan Loaf

PhotoPhotoPhoto

I was trying to learn more about the Gold Medal B4B flour and have a new loaf around the house when I decided to do this little freestyle loaf. I started out with RLBs blanket sponge method and a 64% hydration in mind. An addition of a 1/2 Tbs of water during the mix did move the hydration up an insignificant amount.

The first step was to set up the initial mix of all the water, 28% of the total flour, and 1/8 tsp of ADY in my mixer bowl. I then spooned the remaining flour with another 1/4 tsp of ADY blended in over the initial sponge mix. After covering the bowl, I just let it set at room temperature for about four hours. I could have also stashed the bowl in the fridge for several hours after an hour counter time but that can wait until next time.

Initial Mix

72 g Wheat Montana Prairie Gold flour
28 g Gold Medal B4B flour
230 g water at 80F
1/8 tsp ADY

Cover with
260 g Gold Medal B4B flour
1/4 tsp ADY

Mix three minutes at first speed, add salt, and resume mix at second speed for four minutes.
7 g kosher salt

Place in an oiled container and perform 3-4 stretch and folds at 30 minute intervals. Leave dough to rise until doubled. Shape dough for placement into a small loaf pan. Cover with oiled plastic wrap, leave on counter until dough reaches top edge of pan and place in refrigerator overnight. Remove pan from fridge to warm up. Preheat oven to 425F. When dough crowns or rises to about 1" above the top of the pan, slash and place into oven. Bake at 425F for 15 minutes, turn pan around continue baking at 400F for 20 minutes. Turn oven off, knock loaf out of the pan, and place on the rack in the oven with the door cracked open for 5 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

While the snow peas in the garden are about to make their exit even faster than their arrival, I'm baffled but amused by my chilies AKA peppers. The plants are starting to produce  pods worth picking before the tomatoes have shown any signs of ripening. I picked a single "Big Chile" pepper last Friday and have been avoiding a couple of mature jalopenos in the hope that a little more vine time will spice them up. I may be deluded on that. There are a few chile d'arbol worth picking as well. The lettuce has almost run its course for the Spring. We're still encouraging the cucumber vines to produce and tomatoes to ripen but I haven't found the right language as of yet. I wonder if Google Translate can help.

There's a pain de Campagne in bulk fermentation presently and I'll be baking it tonight. The contractor for tile work for our kitchen's back splash is supposed to be here tomorrow so that loaf will just have to go to its appropriate reward tonight.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Monday, June 16, 2014

City Limits Sourdough Flour Variations

 My usual bread flour is Dakota Maid BF but I ran out a couple of weeks ago. Since I knew Mrs PG would be soon heading to Omaha where we can easily find Dakota Maid flour, I bought some Gold Medal Better for Bread to tide things over. This was a case where I should have followed my own suggestions and kept a record of how the B4B worked out the last I used it, at least two years ago and maybe more than that.

The DM BF differs quite a bit from the B4B in that I can mix up dough to at least 70% hydration without worrying about a slack or sticky dough. The B4B isn't the same kind of bread flour as the DM in that a 70% dough turns out to be right on the edge of my shaping skills and is more like a foccacia dough at that hydration. I'm not saying its bad flour, I just haven't acquired to the skills to adapt to using the B4B at the hydration level my vanity says I should be aiming for.

The last picture in today's batch is a pan loaf that I baked for a neighbor's family since he was generous enough to drive down to the local big orange box store so I could pick up a couple 4'x8' sheets of luaun to be used in our ongoing remodeling. They fit much better in his full size Chevy pick up than they ever would have in my Accord. That loaf felt like it was lower in hydration and handled reasonably well. Recipe to follow further on.

The formula for the first loaf is very familiar to me and I use it frequently. When it came time to shape and retard overnight, I was somewhat skeptical in that the shaped dough looked more like a dog bone than a piece of dough ready for the banneton. The dough was losing more shape the longer I dithered so I grabbed it by the ends and gently compressed it into the banneton. The overnight retarding must have done the trick since it didn't pancake out on me. Good times.

Starter
150 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
270 g GM B4B bread flour
90 g Prairie Gold WWW flour
240 g water at 85F
All of starter
9 g kosher salt

The next loaf was started out as a true 3-2-1 sourdough but I had to add the wrinkle of a 16% addition of some soaked nine grain cereal. Same lessons but less oven spring, most likely due to the soaker cutting into the gluten development.

Starter
120 g at 100% hydration

Soaker
62 g nine grain cereal mix
62g  water
pinch of salt

Main Dough
300 g GM B4B flour
60 g Prairie Gold WWW flour
240 g water at 85F
All of starter
All of soaker
9 g kosher salt

As I mentioned earlier, the last loaf was baked to thank my neighbor for helping me get two sheets of 1/4" luaun from the local HD to my garage. It doesn't look too big because I used a 9.25"x 4.25"x 2.5" pan. I haven't heard back from them but judging from how the bake smelled, it should have been a very good loaf.

Poolish
38 g WWW flour
37 g AP flour
75 g water at 85F
1/8 tsp ADY

Soaker
40 g bulgur (cracked wheat)
40 g Very hot water
soaked for 1 hour

Main Dough
350 g GM B4B flour
100 g AP flour
230 g water at 85F
All of poolish
All of soaker
9 g kosher salt

There has been quite a bit of rain lately, about 6-8" in the area depending on your relative luck or misfortune. The weather has been on the cool side for the area so the plants haven't been under a lot of stress that would cause them to flower. I did find a "volunteer" tomato plant rising up through some basil and a rogue cucumber among the snow peas.The upside to the rainfall is that the ground is soft enough that I can pull out by hand some of the 1-2' saplings that have established themselves. The garlic scapes on my hardneck garlic plants have been trimmed. I've read in one source that I should trim them quickly and another said to leave them on for a while, long enough for them to form two loops. As long as I have enough for cooking and enough to give away, I'll be happy.

My obscure corner of the internet has recently had visits from Algeria, Jersey, and Luxembourg.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.