Friday, July 11, 2014

Cracked Wheat Pan Loaf

 Even though I was in need of a loaf for use around the house, I indulged my sense of whimsy to a minuscule degree with this loaf.I did a little bit of playing around with the ingredients and the oven temperature but still lived to bake another loaf.

As with my previous yeast loaves, I started out with RLB's blanket sponge and then added a cracked wheat (bulgur) soaker because I could. There was some Central Milling AP  mixed in with Graham flour in the sponge portion and the blanket. The dough really proofed out high above the lip of the pan and held its ground during the bake.



While the crumb isn't a magnificent example of being open, it was soft, sweet, and moist.

Soaker
65 g cracked wheat
42 g water
A few grains of kosher salt.
Mixed and covered at the same time as the sponge. It was added in two portions to the dough after the initial mix at first speed.

The blanket sponge was set up as follows:

72 g hard red whole wheat
28 g AP
                                                                    240 g water at 85F
                                                                    1/8 tsp ADY
The ADY was hydrated for 10 minutes in the mixer bowl and then stirred to disperse the ADY. The flour was added and mixed in, making a thin slurry.

                                                                     188 g bread flour
                                                                      72 g AP flour
                                                                      1/2 tsp ADY

The remaining flour and ADY was mixed in another bowl before being spooned on top of the slurry. The bowl was covered and left at room temperature for about six hours before mixing began. The initial mix was three minutes at first speed, after which I determined the dough needed another Tbs of water.
                                                                        8 g kosher salt
 The salt was added and the mixer went to second speed for two minutes. At this time, I added half the soaker, resumed second speed for a minute, added the rest of the soaker, and resumed mixing at second speed for one more minute.

Bulk fermentation required only three stretch and folds at twenty minute intervals and then an hour rest covered. After shaping, the dough was proofed in the pan for about 75 minutes. The loaf was baked in an oven preheated to 425F for 15 minutes, turned around, and then baked at 400 for twenty two minutes.



While my garden is growing vigorously, the only plant in full production is the chile de arbol plant which appears to be unable to control itself. It's large and prolific. The tomato plants are also huge, at least 6 1/2 ft-2 meters tall with lots of green fruit. Those are signs of an impending tomato bonanza for my neighbor and the volunteers at Cushing Hospital. The volunteers will have to make tough choices between tomatoes and cucumbers in about ten days or so. All that garlic that I harvested last week is still drying. Since there are 45 heads of hard neck garlic of very good size from this year's harvest, I should be in good shape garlic wise for quite a while. I found the rogue garlic underneath the spreading day lily leaves in one of my flowerbeds. Two were miserable examples but two were worth setting aside for replanting in the Autumn. The tunnels indicative of moles burrowing through the yard have reappeared. They obviously have nothing but contempt for my efforts to discourage them.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Sunday, June 29, 2014

16% and 25% WWW Sourdough Loaves


 Thanks to Mrs PG, the Dakota Maid Bread Flour is back in stock. So on Thursday night, I began to build up a starter for some weekend baking. The first loaf went to Mr Barney for helping me out with a part of our kitchen remodeling project. I don't have the required tools but Mr Barney does so I baked a loaf that I knew his family would enjoy.

It was a 16% WWW sourdough at about 72% hydration. The DM flour made it a lot easier to do this time. The dough was a little bit sticky during shaping but an overnight retarded proofing in the fridge helped out quite a bit. The loaf didn't have an outflow in the oven after loading so I got to breath a sigh of relief and continue work on the next loaf for Mrs PG and I.

16% WWW Sourdough
Starter
150 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
300 g Dakota Maid Bread Flour
60 g Wheat Montana Prairie Gold flour
240 g water at 85 F
All of starter
9 g kosher salt

25% WWW Sourdough
Starter
150 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
270 g Dakota Maid Bread Flour
90 g stone ground Wheat Montana Prairie Gold flour
230 g water at 85 F
All of starter
9 g kosher salt

This second loaf differed from my usual routine in that I used the refrigerator during the bulk fermentation of the dough. I shaped the dough for my brotform as soon as it had dried out from the first loaf. It sat downstairs in the somewhat cooler basement while we applied a circular saws, sabre saw, hammer, and other implements of discipline on some manufactured wood products. By the time I was ready to sweep up the sawdust and wood scraps, the second loaf had proofed very well without any oversight. It turned out well though this time around I didn't follow the bake with a five minute cool down with the oven door cracked open. Its A/C weather in Kansas these days and cracking open an oven cooling down from 425 F just didn't seem very prudent. There is a difference in the flavor of the two different forms of the WM Prairie Gold in loaves like this that goes beyond the percentage. The stone ground flour has a bit of the tannin flavors that are in hard red whole wheat flour whereas the store bought Prairie Gold is smoother. To put the difference in perspective, a beer drinking baker will recognize the signature of the Cascade hops used in Sierra Nevada  Pale Ale. When drinking a similar ale, he or she will notice the difference if Chinook or Centennial hops are used. In the end, its all good, just different enough to notice.



The passing of the Summer solstice seems to be making a difference in my garden. The garlic crop is almost ready, I dug up a few, and should be ready to start the digging  by Thursday. I still don't have any ripe tomatoes which isn't good at all. July 4th is my usual latest day for the first red, ripe tomato and this year could be different. I suppose that as long as the local deer or squirrels ruin my expectations, I should get over it. A few of the wheat berries left in the straw I use for mulch actually grew up enough for me to actually recognize it before it got knocked over. Not many birds are at my feeder these days since there is so much other food available at this time of year.

Just twelve or so miles north of here in Atchison, KS, a tornado and torrential rains passed through tonight. We saw a very brief shower and heard some thunder but missed the excitement. I've lived here in the middle of tornado country for forty years and have yet to see a tornado. Maybe I will and maybe I won't before I die. As long as I have good shelter to run to when it starts to drop down, I'd still like to see one from a distance.

My obscure corner of the internet had a few unexpected views from Brazil this past week. With all the excitement of the World Cup going on down there, I was surprised to see that happen.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.


Monday, June 23, 2014

A Nice Pan Loaf

PhotoPhotoPhoto

I was trying to learn more about the Gold Medal B4B flour and have a new loaf around the house when I decided to do this little freestyle loaf. I started out with RLBs blanket sponge method and a 64% hydration in mind. An addition of a 1/2 Tbs of water during the mix did move the hydration up an insignificant amount.

The first step was to set up the initial mix of all the water, 28% of the total flour, and 1/8 tsp of ADY in my mixer bowl. I then spooned the remaining flour with another 1/4 tsp of ADY blended in over the initial sponge mix. After covering the bowl, I just let it set at room temperature for about four hours. I could have also stashed the bowl in the fridge for several hours after an hour counter time but that can wait until next time.

Initial Mix

72 g Wheat Montana Prairie Gold flour
28 g Gold Medal B4B flour
230 g water at 80F
1/8 tsp ADY

Cover with
260 g Gold Medal B4B flour
1/4 tsp ADY

Mix three minutes at first speed, add salt, and resume mix at second speed for four minutes.
7 g kosher salt

Place in an oiled container and perform 3-4 stretch and folds at 30 minute intervals. Leave dough to rise until doubled. Shape dough for placement into a small loaf pan. Cover with oiled plastic wrap, leave on counter until dough reaches top edge of pan and place in refrigerator overnight. Remove pan from fridge to warm up. Preheat oven to 425F. When dough crowns or rises to about 1" above the top of the pan, slash and place into oven. Bake at 425F for 15 minutes, turn pan around continue baking at 400F for 20 minutes. Turn oven off, knock loaf out of the pan, and place on the rack in the oven with the door cracked open for 5 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

While the snow peas in the garden are about to make their exit even faster than their arrival, I'm baffled but amused by my chilies AKA peppers. The plants are starting to produce  pods worth picking before the tomatoes have shown any signs of ripening. I picked a single "Big Chile" pepper last Friday and have been avoiding a couple of mature jalopenos in the hope that a little more vine time will spice them up. I may be deluded on that. There are a few chile d'arbol worth picking as well. The lettuce has almost run its course for the Spring. We're still encouraging the cucumber vines to produce and tomatoes to ripen but I haven't found the right language as of yet. I wonder if Google Translate can help.

There's a pain de Campagne in bulk fermentation presently and I'll be baking it tonight. The contractor for tile work for our kitchen's back splash is supposed to be here tomorrow so that loaf will just have to go to its appropriate reward tonight.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Monday, June 16, 2014

City Limits Sourdough Flour Variations

 My usual bread flour is Dakota Maid BF but I ran out a couple of weeks ago. Since I knew Mrs PG would be soon heading to Omaha where we can easily find Dakota Maid flour, I bought some Gold Medal Better for Bread to tide things over. This was a case where I should have followed my own suggestions and kept a record of how the B4B worked out the last I used it, at least two years ago and maybe more than that.

The DM BF differs quite a bit from the B4B in that I can mix up dough to at least 70% hydration without worrying about a slack or sticky dough. The B4B isn't the same kind of bread flour as the DM in that a 70% dough turns out to be right on the edge of my shaping skills and is more like a foccacia dough at that hydration. I'm not saying its bad flour, I just haven't acquired to the skills to adapt to using the B4B at the hydration level my vanity says I should be aiming for.

The last picture in today's batch is a pan loaf that I baked for a neighbor's family since he was generous enough to drive down to the local big orange box store so I could pick up a couple 4'x8' sheets of luaun to be used in our ongoing remodeling. They fit much better in his full size Chevy pick up than they ever would have in my Accord. That loaf felt like it was lower in hydration and handled reasonably well. Recipe to follow further on.

The formula for the first loaf is very familiar to me and I use it frequently. When it came time to shape and retard overnight, I was somewhat skeptical in that the shaped dough looked more like a dog bone than a piece of dough ready for the banneton. The dough was losing more shape the longer I dithered so I grabbed it by the ends and gently compressed it into the banneton. The overnight retarding must have done the trick since it didn't pancake out on me. Good times.

Starter
150 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
270 g GM B4B bread flour
90 g Prairie Gold WWW flour
240 g water at 85F
All of starter
9 g kosher salt

The next loaf was started out as a true 3-2-1 sourdough but I had to add the wrinkle of a 16% addition of some soaked nine grain cereal. Same lessons but less oven spring, most likely due to the soaker cutting into the gluten development.

Starter
120 g at 100% hydration

Soaker
62 g nine grain cereal mix
62g  water
pinch of salt

Main Dough
300 g GM B4B flour
60 g Prairie Gold WWW flour
240 g water at 85F
All of starter
All of soaker
9 g kosher salt

As I mentioned earlier, the last loaf was baked to thank my neighbor for helping me get two sheets of 1/4" luaun from the local HD to my garage. It doesn't look too big because I used a 9.25"x 4.25"x 2.5" pan. I haven't heard back from them but judging from how the bake smelled, it should have been a very good loaf.

Poolish
38 g WWW flour
37 g AP flour
75 g water at 85F
1/8 tsp ADY

Soaker
40 g bulgur (cracked wheat)
40 g Very hot water
soaked for 1 hour

Main Dough
350 g GM B4B flour
100 g AP flour
230 g water at 85F
All of poolish
All of soaker
9 g kosher salt

There has been quite a bit of rain lately, about 6-8" in the area depending on your relative luck or misfortune. The weather has been on the cool side for the area so the plants haven't been under a lot of stress that would cause them to flower. I did find a "volunteer" tomato plant rising up through some basil and a rogue cucumber among the snow peas.The upside to the rainfall is that the ground is soft enough that I can pull out by hand some of the 1-2' saplings that have established themselves. The garlic scapes on my hardneck garlic plants have been trimmed. I've read in one source that I should trim them quickly and another said to leave them on for a while, long enough for them to form two loops. As long as I have enough for cooking and enough to give away, I'll be happy.

My obscure corner of the internet has recently had visits from Algeria, Jersey, and Luxembourg.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.




Wednesday, June 04, 2014

A newish Bulgur Sourdough loaf



Now that my kitchen is slowly be reorganized and remodeled, I'm back to rebuilding my starter and researching new breads to try.The first loaf pictured was my first loaf after the counter top was put in. Mrs PG couldn't resist slicing it while I was at the gym, waiting for it to cool off. It was a simple 75% BF/25% WWW hybrid loaf with 1/2 tsp ADY to make sure it fermented in a reasonable time. As little as 1/2 tsp ADY made a difference in the flavor.

The second loaf is a sourdough with bulgur, cracked wheat, mixed in. Like other bakers, I've come to appreciate the extra flavor it adds to a loaf of bread. The next thing to add to the loaf is a more open crumb.

Starter
150g at 100%, fed with 75% organic AP/ 25% stone ground rye

Soaker
64g bulgur
48g water

Main Dough
270g bread flour
90g white whole wheat
240g water at 85F
All of starter
All of soaker
9g kosher salt




With all the recent rains, the garden is humming along and getting bigger. My lettuce planting is really huge to the point where we can't eat it fast enough to keep it under control. The snow peas haven't yet gotten the message that they should be at work but I suspect that when they do, I'll complain about too much too late. The herbs are reaching jungle status with the oregano in the lead,. I'm not used to seeing it 14 inches tall and over two feet wide. I have jalapenos and a couple of tomatoes to reassure me that there will be pico de gallo in a month or so when the garlic will be ready to harvest.

My bird visitors are fewer in number so I'm taking the time to reseed the lawn in areas that the moles destroyed. I haven't seen any sign of the rodents lately but I suspect that as soon as the lawns start drying up, they'll be back to reprise their "Terminator" roles. There is a too large to ignore number of trash tree seedlings this year in the flower beds. Eternal vigilance and a willingness to pluck them out of the ground are the price of a less than chaotic border for the yard.

New visitors to my obscure corner of the internet include someone from Panama and Georgia.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Friday, May 23, 2014

Why the Sabbatical

It has been more than a month since my last post and there are reasons. The first is  that I was in the process of rehabbing my starter to get it back up to strength. It would raise bread but it was too slow for me and as the pictures show, nothing was really an advancement. So I baked for home consumption and increased the feeding schedule to the point where I was finally getting a nice bubbly top on the builds. I was ready to bake what I expected would be something really good until my plans were halted by an unexpected occurrence.

The night before my expected bake, the contractor for the installation of new cabinets called to say he would be here at 815 AM to start work. We expected him on Friday, not for Thursday. Not many too many people can say that their contractor showed up a day early. So I packed the build into two containers after packing in as much Central Mills AP as I could into the starters and moved them into the beer fridge for a nap. Today, some fifteen days later, the counter top is supposed to be delivered any moment, and the installation should begin by mid morning tomorrow. Mrs PG and I are appropriately pleased to know that we will once again have a work space and a sink to help clean up my messes. The work lights are now LED rather than fluorescent so my pictures should have less of that yellow cast. I'm hoping that by Monday I will have rebooted my starter and be ready to fire up the oven for a bake that night. After buying a loaf of "multi grain" bread at Costco, I'm ready for some home made bread ASAP.





 The world outside my window here has gone through some big changes. The trees have filled out and the garden is busy at growing good stuff. Once again, an Ixtapa variety jalapeno is the first to produce something among the four pepper plants. I only put in three tomato plants in an optimistic assumption that I would have fewer wasted by the end of the season. I have healthy oregano and sage plants that wintered over plus a new rosemary plant so I'll have some good, fresh herbs for foccacia and rosemary bread, Pane Marino. The two varieties of leaf lettuce are now thriving after the recent rains.


Some of the most recent visitors to this obscure corner of the internet were from Brunei, Lithuania, and Pakistan.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Hidden Bread Interiors, lots of pictures and text

My starter has been an up and down thing as of late. Partly due to the changing season and also due to switching over from KAF AP flour to feed it to Central Milling Organic AP. It still works but its growth rate during refreshment is erratic. As long as it works, it's good.

I've also run into skill set problems as I attempt to increase the hydration level in my sourdough breads with add ins. Pictured today are a 73% hydration loaf with cracked wheat and a 73% loaf with bran. I concede that I was looking for trouble when the loaves also had at least 25% white whole wheat as part of the total flour.









While both were made using my wooden bowl, mixing by hand, and turning the dough rather than using the stand mixer, I didn't help my cause by not having enough practice to deal with the dough when shaping. They looked a bit like focaccia loaves rather than a sourdough. The birds didn't their beaks on either of them.

I was pleased by the next two loaves that I baked for a meet and greet party for a candidate for the local Congressional district. I deliberately used the same formula but one was machine mixed and the boule by hand in my bowl. During the initial mix for the boule, I thought the dough was dry for a 71% hydration level so I added 1/2 TBL of water before I let it rest. This resulted in a slack dough that required more turns than usual. Since then, I've found that if I just let the initial mix rest for 20-25 minutes, the dough is no longer dry and behaves well.

In any case, the bread was well received by all. A retired teacher, a general practitioner, his wife, and the candidate all approved so I felt good about the results.

Starter
120 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
270 g bread flour
70 g white whole wheat flour
20 g spelt flour
240 g water at 85F
120 g starter
10 g sea salt

The next loaf also is without a crumb shot because it was baked for the Cushing Hospital Volunteers Spring Bake Sale. Mrs PG gave me the OK to do only one loaf so I decided to create off the top of my head. It was called a Pain Menage, which is a catch all name for a French household loaf. Ordinarily, a Pain Ordinaire dough is used but since French housewives have been known to frugal enough to use what they have at hand and the bake sale customers not known to be sticklers for titles, the name was used and the loaf sold quickly. You might call it a Pain de Campagne and be correct. This loaf sang particularly loud after being puled from the oven and had cracks in the exterior crust during cooling off. It looked dramatic to me.

Poolish
70 g white whole wheat flour
30 g KAF AP flour
20 g stone ground whole rye flour
120 g water at 85F
1/4 tsp ADY
Main Dough
300 g bread flour
152 g water at 85F
All of poolish
9 g sea salt
1/2 tsp ADY

The last loaf is one I sliced this morning for breakfast. It turned out well for 33% WWW flour sourdough with a nice open and moist crumb.It's not innovative or particularly spectacular but since my kitchen is going to undergo remodeling in about ten days, I'll need this and a few more loaves to be frozen as sandwiches and slices for the approximately three weeks that I'll be without an oven, counter top, and sink.





Starter
140 g at 100% hydration
Main Dough
240 g bread flour
120 g WWW flour
240 g water at 78F
All of starter
9 g sea salt

Lots of changes in the yard that seem to happen overnight. The pear tree outside my window is still blooming but the first leafs are emerging and the blossom petals are falling like snow. I've found four volunteer garlic growing in a flower bed. I didn't plant any garlic there so I guess that they originated in some of the mulch that was from our compost tumbler. They're growing faster than the garlic I deliberately planted last fall so I'm really curious to see what I dig up as they reach maturity. The juncos have left for their summer migration to Canada but we have lots of goldfinches at the feeders. There are broken robin's egg shells in the yard and lots of robins as well.

Some of the visitors to my obscure corner of the internet have dropped by from Tanzania, Brazil, and Switzerland

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Friday, April 04, 2014

City Limits Sourdough with Levain


The last couple of loaves that I've baked have taken a different direction. Rather than use my stand mixer, I simplified by using my large wooden bowl, minimal mixing, and a liquid levain in this loaf. The previous loaf used a 110% hydration levain so I am reluctant to brand that a liquid levain. On this loaf, I deliberately aimed at 125% hydration which I suspect qualifies for that "liquid" classification. Since it works, it really doesn't make that big a deal.

I started out by first mixing and whisking the levain, water, and about 70-80g of my mixed flours with the idea that it would help  disperse the yeast beasts. Then I added the remainder of the flour and mixed it up to the well known shaggy mass, covered the bowl, and let it rest for twenty minutes. The salt was added and I used my dough whisk to mix that salt as well as I could. At this point, the dough was slack and sticky. While turning the bowl slowly, I pulled the dough up from the bottom of the mass towards the center. I repeated this around thirty times and then turned the dough over, covered, and let it rest for thirty minutes. This was done three more times and the dough had gained enough strength that I felt confident enough to just put it in a covered and oiled container for the remainder of the bulk fermentation. At a 70F room temperature, this took three hours.

When the bulk fermentation was over, I went through shaping, rested the loaf in its brotform for 45 minutes on the counter and put it in the fridge for an overnight retarded proofing. In the morning, after two hours of resting on the counter at room temperature, the loaf was ready for a simple slashing and then into a preheated oven with a baking stone at 450F. After 15 minutes, I pulled out my parchment paper, turned the loaf around 180 degrees, and then dropped the oven setting to 425F for the last 22 minutes.

These pictures were taken after three hours of cooling. The taste is slightly sour and the crumb is tender. I estimated that my hydration for this loaf ran about 73% which helped the openness.I think it looks  good considering the 25% WWW content. The most important thing or discovery has been how easy this new process has turned out to be.

Levain
170 g at 125% hydration

Main dough
270 g bread flour
90 g fresh milled Prairie Gold WWW
230 g water at 90F
10 g kosher salt
All of the levain

Outside the window, the yard is starting to green up. We had some rain a couple days ago and it has made an immediate impact. If we get warmer temperatures, things will get going at rapid pace. I bought twenty 2 cu. ft. bags of cypress mulch for the flower beds and I probably should have doubled that purchase. I checked the herbs that I wintered over in the garden and found that the rosemary was, no surprise, quite dead. The sage and oregano do look somewhat rough but they can be coaxed back into production with some long, sunny days. The last picture is our first daffodil of the year. Their disposition makes up for the discomfort from the pollen of newly budding trees.

It seems that this blog has been discovered by a web crawler from semalt.com. I have no idea why they'd be interested in my obscure corner of the internet but obviously, I'm not so obscure anymore.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Bran Dusted Levain Loaf


 I started out with the idea that I wanted to do a Pane Genzano, an Italian bread that has a bran coating on the crust. The bran adds some heating resistance to an already high hydration, 75% in Genzano, so a longer bake time needs to be planned for or you can play your intuition card. My loaf didn't quite turn out to meet the original's description due to a fortuitous mistake or two on my part. But, it did turn out really well in my book other than the lesson that the bran dusting can quickly become messy on the cutting board.

When Carol Fields included the Pane Genzano recipe in her book, "The Italian Baker", she described the bakers using leftover dough from the previous batch as the starter for the bread. IIRC, she called it a "natural leaven". I used a starter that ranged around 111% hydration, not quite a liquid levain, but far from my usual planned bread hydration matching starters. I was absent minded when scaling my ingredients, weighing out 400 g total flour instead of my intended 360g. The 240g of weighed water in turn should have meant a concrete dough but the 170g of levain appears to have fixed that error because my estimates seem to show that the dough had an overall 68-69% hydration. I cheated on the bran dusting in that I simply dusted the towel meant to sit between the dough and brotform with bran. It was an experiment that I thought might be easier than any other method I had read.

This loaf is one of my better efforts over the past few months. The crumb shot is typical of the loaf all the way through. The aveoli have a nice, shiny, gelatinized gloss. While I initially attributed this to using an almost liquid levain, I can't rule out that the bran on the crust slowed down the heat penetration, giving the yeast more time than usual to create that crumb. I'll have to try repeatedly using a liquid levain again to make heads or tails of what happened. If they work for J Hamelman, they can work for me as long as I put in the effort to observe and learn.

Levain
170 g at 111% hydration, 80% KAF AP, 20% Prairie Gold WWW

Main Dough
270 g bread flour
130 g WWW
240 g water at 85F
All of levain
10 g kosher salt
bran for dusting brotform towel

Other than a few crocuses blooming, Springtime appears to be late at Casa PG. There may be daffodils blooming this afternoon or tomorrow but that is still at least ten days to two weeks late. I haven't started in the garden due to cool weather and damp soil. It might be worthwhile to dig up a small area to plant snow peas but that will have to wait until I finish cleaning the property borders. Out by the bird feeders, there are the usual suspects from this past winter. The juncos haven't left yet but that could happen any day now. A few days with weather warm enough to work outside and about twenty bags of cypress mulch will do wonders for the appearance of the yard until the moles return to bedevil me and frustrate my efforts.

More visitors have shown up to view my obscure corner of the internet. Visitors have looked in from Singapore, Afghanistan, Chile, Ecuador, and Sweden.

Compliments, humor, and questions are welcome.


Friday, March 14, 2014

Stureby Levain Loaf and Pane Canserricio con Semolina


 I think I finally figured out how to get past the problem with Picassa and get the images I want posted here on my blog. It's not elegant but on with the show.

The first few pictures are from my first attempt at a Stureby Levain Loaf, a formula I found on the Plotzblog site. While Lutz baked a large, about two pounds or 1900 g, I divided the dough into one pound batards before baking. After looking at the ingredients list, I thought it looked a lot like those of a lean pain de campagne or bauernbrot, only using the WWW and rye flours in the 100% hydration starter.

I did aerate the starter at the beginning of the process but for the most past, I followed procedure. The resultant loaf is a pleasant, lightly textured loaf with a soft crumb.
 Starter
50 g bread flour
50 g water
10 g sourdough

Dough 1
All of starter
75 g whole wheat flour
25 g rye flour
100 g water

Dough 2
All of dough 1
375 g bread flour
                                                                                    225 g water
                                                                                    10 g salt


The Pane Canserricio con Semolina is a totally inauthentic name but very serviceable loaf of bread. I saw a small bag, two pounds, of semolina flour for pasta in a supermarket yesterday and decided to see what I could do with it. Even though I used KAF AP instead of bread flour, I got an acceptable oven spring instead of a flattened oval. I like the flavor enough to put out the ingredients to see if anyone else will give it a chance and report back.

Starter
132 g at 100% hydration

Main Dough
240 g KAF AP
120 g semolina flour
245 g water
10 g kosher salt

The weather is slowly turning to seasonal temperatures outside, warm enough that I can do some preliminary clean up work and start daydreaming about all the things I should do. The daffodils and tulips are finally starting to emerge. I checked on the garlic beds and there is reason for hope there as well. The juncos are still around and the year round suspects are gaining a few robins for company.

Comments, humor, and questions are welcome.